Tagged neuroscience

Get Busy Living Or Get Busy Dying

My College Writing assignment is due in two weeks. Feeling confident with the time remaining, I casually dismiss it and decide to watch the final game of the World Series, only to see the Nationals defeat the Astros in disappointment. One week later, I check the assignment again and decide to postpone it. Instead, I…

The Case for Dancing with Illnesses

When we think about the prehistoric ages, we imagine cavemen, igloos, and mediocre broken speech. However, scientists worldwide have voiced that there is reason to suggest dancing was in the mix. Professor Richard Ebstein of the psychology department at the Hebrew University‘s Scheinfeld Center for Genetic Studies believed that dancing is an activity humans were…

Love in a Borderline Personality

Love sucks. It makes people act in ways they can’t predict and gives them weird fluttering feelings in their stomach. However, healthy people at least tend to know what to expect with love, and modern research has even discovered the molecules involved in the development of romantic attraction, both emotionally and physiologically. One of cupid’s…

What Happens Now?

You wake up on the ground with blurry vision and feeling nauseous. The last thing you remember is going up for a header – a routine play in a routine match. The trainer runs onto the field and asks some standard questions. “What’s the score? Which half is it now? Did the team win the…

Remembering Alzheimer’s Disease

Friends and family members of Alzheimer’s patients endure the heartbreak of watching a loved one lose their memory and independence. As the United States demographic becomes increasingly top heavy—with the portion of the population over 65 years estimated to more than double by 2060—the need for Alzheimer’s disease research is immediate. The suffering that Alzheimer’s…

Phantom Limbs: The Missing Link

Scientists, researchers, and physicians alike still have not been able to pinpoint the precise cause of phantom pain, a term coined by Silas Weir Mitchell in 1871. Phantom limb is used to reference a syndrome in which patients experience pain or other sensations originating from a nonexistent limb. There may also be discrepancies between the…

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